Public Transit Survey

UTA is currently conducting a survey on “Bus/Rail Integration” in Utah County. Take it here. The survey is being conducted in anticipation of the arrival of Frontrunner commuter rail in December. Also, apparently there are fewer resources than anticipated, so the survey is gauging how people want to connect with the new rail system.

When you take the survey, it will ask which option you hypothetically prefer:

Option 1: Bus routes that cover a smaller geographic area with more frequent service or

Option 2: Bus routes that cover a larger geographic area with less frequent service.

Answer as you see fit, but I’d recommend devoting more resources to Option 1. Obviously, Option 2 will serve a larger potential customer base — one that’s probably more middle class and living in more suburban neighborhoods (and that’s more likely to take voluntary government surveys). But as the subsequent questions point out, it’s also more expensive. In addition, infrequent buses don’t really serve anyone well, no matter where they live; if only a couple of buses pass by your neighborhood a day, it’s unlikely they’ll be timed to coincide with enough people’s schedules to make them worth it.

Option 1, on the other hand, theoretically would make one area really accessible by public transit. It would encourage development along those corridors being served frequently, allow some people to genuinely ditch their cars, and will make the train system more accessible. In other words, Option 1 will encourage more growth in the city and be cheaper.

But either way, the survey is important because it  signifies the increasing integration of public transit into the Utah Valley community.

A new platform for the Frontrunner commuter rail train, which arrives in Provo in December. A new survey asks residents how they want the bus system to integrate into the rail system.

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Filed under commuting, Development, driving, economics, travel

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