Biking and Walking are the Keys to Attracting Youth

It doesn’t take a genius to realize that cities need to attract young people if they want to survive. Most of us have probably even been to dying towns where few young people stick around when they reach adulthood. Provo needs to exercise constant vigilance so it doesn’t become one of those towns.

This article from the Stamford Advocate argues that a major key to doing that is looking at transportation. Though it focuses on cities in Conneticut, the same could probably be said for Provo:

Connecticut municipalities continue to lose 25- to 34-year-old professionals to Brooklyn, N.Y., and cities such as Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., where neighborhoods have made greater strides to incorporate bicycle lanes and more pedestrian amenities a reality.

“People are looking for a better options for housing and transportation, amenities for walking and biking, access to entertainment and possible spouses,” Kooris said. “When we think about the face of Connecticut we’ll have in the future, we need to think about the kind of communities where you’re not relying on a car for every trip under two miles.”

The article goes on to mention the importance of roadway design to creating vibrant streets, and attracting “affluent” young professionals — a demographic Provo also needs more of.

One thing I also like here is that the article acknowledges that implementation of programs to increase walkability are “inexpensive,” not “free.” The point is that making better neighborhoods — ones that are a pleasure to live in and that will attract future generations — will require some financial investment.

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4 Comments

Filed under biking, commuting, Development

4 responses to “Biking and Walking are the Keys to Attracting Youth

  1. Pingback: Toward a Strolling Environment | (pro(vo)cation)

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  3. Pingback: Becoming a Bike Friendly City | (pro(vo)cation)

  4. Pingback: Bikes and Money | (pro(vo)cation)

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